The future of education is online: a joint submission by government, industry and academia

It’s not just the government, it’s also academia, with more than 100 organisations in the private sector and government joining forces to explore ways of digitising teaching, research and learning.But in the meantime, education will continue to be delivered through the written word, as evidenced by the fact that this week the Royal Society, the…

Published by admin inJuly 12, 2021
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It’s not just the government, it’s also academia, with more than 100 organisations in the private sector and government joining forces to explore ways of digitising teaching, research and learning.

But in the meantime, education will continue to be delivered through the written word, as evidenced by the fact that this week the Royal Society, the society of writers, commissioned a report on what it believes is the future of teaching and learning in Australia.

The report, written by leading academic researchers and academics from across Australia, includes a number of recommendations, including more effective teaching strategies, a wider range of subjects, and more effective support to teachers, to make sure they have the right tools to deliver the right message.

It also sets out the potential of using computer science and artificial intelligence to help schools and students, and the potential risks and challenges for education in this rapidly changing world.

In a statement, the Royal Societies said the report should be viewed as a call for greater collaboration between academics and government to ensure the best possible outcomes for all Australians, including teachers, students, teachers and students.

The National Association of Teaching Assistants (NASTA) is also urging the government to take a more active role in promoting digital learning in the classroom.

“The NASTA welcomes the NASTA’s call for the Government to invest in digital learning as an essential part of the delivery of high quality education to all Australians,” said NASTA chief executive, John McAllister.

“In particular, NASTA will support the Government’s efforts to ensure that the technology is in place to enable more digital learning opportunities for all.”

He said digital learning is a key element of the National Digital Education Plan that was released in February, and that NASTA had recently seen the launch of its Digital Skills Plan, which aims to support teachers in building a digital workforce that is resilient and adaptable.

“Digital is the next step in delivering digital learning,” Mr McAllisters said.

“We need a strong, diverse and inclusive workforce to enable us to deliver on our Digital Skills Agenda.”

This digital workforce must be connected, collaborative and flexible.

We need to create the right environment for digital learning to flourish.

“The National Digital Skills Framework aims to provide teachers with the tools to achieve digital learning goals, including: • The ability to create and share information across multiple devices • A platform for students to connect to and share knowledge across devices • The development of digital skills training programmes and digital skills curricula across the country.

Mr McAlliers believes the National Plan and Digital Skills plan will provide a great starting point for teachers to build on and make sure their digital learning skills are relevant to their teaching.”

A strong digital education model needs to include teachers, teachers’ colleges and education partners, including schools, universities and other stakeholders,” he said.

He said the National Skills Plan was a “roadmap for digital teaching”.”

The National Skills Framework is a great example of how we can create the digital education we need to enable all Australians to achieve their full potential in this digital age,” he added.”

What is more important is to ensure all Australians have access to the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in the digital age, and are well-positioned to succeed.